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Welcome to Next Week on Xbox! Here we cover all the new games coming soon to Xbox Series X|S, Xbox One, and Windows 10 PC as well as upcoming Xbox Game Pass and soon-to-be released [email protected] titles! Get more details on the games below and click their profiles for pre-order details when available (release dates […]

A new gameplay trailer for the upcoming open-world MMO survival game The Day Before has arrived, and it’s giving off some major The Last of Us vibes. The game is set in a post-pandemic America where zombies are a constant danger and the remaining humans are fighting to control what precious few resources remain.

The 13-minute gameplay trailer from IGN provides the best look at the game yet. We see a player driving down a muddy road in an SUV who pulls into a dilapidated gas station to collect resources. Zombies show up and the player mows them down with an assault rifle and a pistol.

The trailer also shows off the game’s crafting system and some of the attention to detail in the environments. There is also a particularly tense encounter where the player tries to turn off a house alarm… but it doesn’t go so well.

The Day Before is developed by Fntastic, which is headquartered in the coldest city on Earth–Yakutski Russia. The developers don’t all live there, however, as Fntastic is an all-remote studio.

The Day Before is not the first large-scale zombie MMO game, as it follows the likes of DayZ, DayZ, Rust, and others.

The doesn’t have a release date yet, but you can put The Day Before on your Steam Wishlist now.

Xbox Series S Review | Next Generation Gaming At An Affordable Price

For all its automated systems, Loop Hero can be incredibly stressful. Battles play out without any input from you, navigation loops over a predetermined path, and resources are collected for you, but that doesn’t mean you can take your eyes off the battlefield for even a second. This captivating mix of familiar genres demands constant attention, testing your ability to think well into the future when making your moves. It’s a riveting balance of risk and reward wrapped in a deviously challenging roguelite that will tempt you into pushing forward for just one more round.

Loop Hero is a distinct mish-mash of multiple genre ideas, none of which influence gameplay enough to easily classify the overall gameplay experience. Loop Hero is primarily a run-based role-playing game in which you indirectly control a hero through procedurally generated loops. Instead of controlling the hero’s movements, you mainly control what they encounter by placing objects on the loop that create the world–things like cemeteries that can spawn skeletons, villages that can heal you, or swamps that generate nasty mosquitos. These are provided by cards that you draw from a limited deck which you can edit between runs, letting you curate each one to a degree. And while your hero automatically navigates in circles and resolves fights with enemies without any inputs, you also manage their inventory carefully to deal with the increasing challenges that each new round trip brings.

Instead of controlling the hero's movements in Loop Hero, you control what they encounter on the loop.
Instead of controlling the hero’s movements in Loop Hero, you control what they encounter on the loop.

Ultimately, Loop Hero challenges you to balance risk and reward by keenly considering all the options your current cards give you to make your next loop challenging, but not deadly. Each run is an opportunity to gather resources you use to expand your camp in the hub world, unlocking new cards, classes, and abilities to use on subsequent runs. Enemies drop specific resources that you’ll need to further progress outside of each expedition, giving you incentives to place multiple groves for wild, mutated dogs or dimly lit houses that can spawn bloodthirsty vampires on tiles around them. With each new addition to the loop, you’re also extending the time it takes to make a trip around it, which directly affects spawn rates of enemies that are tied to a persistent day-night cycle. While a tile might seem harmless when it’s only adding one enemy to the loop every day, it can become dangerous when the route is stuffed to the point where an entire group might be waiting the next time you make it around again.

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